Morgawr: Cornwalls Sea Monster

In my welcome post I promised you the occasional sea monster, and dammit I’m goin to do just that!
Ladies and Gents I present you with a sea monster that unfortunately gets less coverage than that of Nessie.
I give you Cornwall’s, Morgawr!

Me and my wife have a big fascination with all things deemed unexplained. One such example is Cryptozoology (In Greek the term literally means study of hidden animals) the timeless search. animals whose existence on our tiny planet have not yet been proved.
We have heard of The Loch Ness Monster of Scotland, and of course Big Foot, and The Abominable Snowman, but there are a lot of lesser known examples of these fascinating Cryptids (as they are called).
Morgawr hails from the Cornish Seas (mostly around Falmouth). its name means Sea monster in the now disused language of Cornish. There have been documented cases of sightings as far back as 1876. Cornish fishermen have claimed to have caught Morgawr in their nets and claim it is about 20 feet long.
One of the documented sightings at Pendennis Point Falmouth, September 1975, witnesses claim to have seen a humped creature with ‘stumpy horns’ and bristles on its long neck, catching a conger eel in its mouth. The waters where Morgawr has been sighted, usually contain plenty of conger eels, it has been sighted as far as the Plymouth coast but tends to favour the waters around Falmouth and surrounding areas.
Theories have been passed around as to what Morgawr might actually be. Some say that it is mistaken for a rare species of long necked seal, others say it could be a Basking Shark or even a dead Basking Shark. To both of these theories I say nay! Basking Sharks are notoriously shy and stay submerged, and although they are peculiar looking they don’t resemble anything like what is stated by the many witnesses. The more plausible theory is that Morgawr is a species of prehistoric Plesiosaur.
This in my opinion is most probably what it is. After all why not? We know less about our own Oceans than we do about our Galaxy. Who knows what mysteries really lie in our seas? Why shouldn’t a species of Dinosaur survive? With the time they have spent on this earth they are probably rather good at hiding!
Of course there are those who of course cry “hoax” at the many documented sightings of any sea monster or anything that is unexplained for that matter. My view is, there is more to this world than meets the eye and just because you can’t see something doesn’t mean its not there!
Hopefully one day the unexplained will become clear! One worry I do have about the future of these unexplained creatures is, that I hope we (as humans) do not attempt at some sort of capture of any Cryptid creature and exhibit him/her for tourist and monetary purposes. These creatures are doing very well without our interference we as humans need to let them do just that.

Many people see Cryptozoology as a pseudoscience and not a reputable use of scientific study. But in this day and age who can truly say what a true science is and what is not? Is the search for Extra Terrestrial Biological Entities a true science? Some would say no! I would yet again disagree with that. If other life can exist on undiscovered planets why can’t undiscovered creatures exist on our humble planet? Let us not forget some milestones of Cryptozoology, include the Mountain Gorilla and the Okapi both of which were said not to exist, and also the Komodo Dragon which before 1912 was referred to I believe as a Monitor Lizard. Other Hallmarks include proof of the existence of the giant squid by photographic evidence In 2004 I’m also to the understanding that a giant squid has recently been filmed.

I hope to one day (along with my wife) see Morgawr for myself as well as other sea monsters.
Some might see me as foolish, to them I say; the world that exists underneath us, and above us is much stranger than fiction and holds countless possibilities!
So here’s to Morgawr! The sea monster of Cornwall! May he/she never run out of conger eels!

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